In the Fall, Fields Provide…for 11.22.2014

We repeat ourselves often, expressing our love for fall. We know. It’s just that it’s so easy to love fall around here. Fall is dominated by harvesting. Less planting, less soil and plant maintenance, less worry about disease overtaking a whole family of plants. The heat and humidity are so stressful in the summer that fall feels like a huge sigh of relief, followed by delicious meals from harvests that feel easy. Gratitude this time of year is so visceral for us.
packing csa boxes
Granted, it seems like we may have had a very short autumn this year, skipping on ahead to winter weather. But the enjoyment and gratitude remain. Our work days are unavoidably shorter. We get to enjoy food we canned in earlier months. And what other time of year can we simultaneously enjoy roasting sweet potatoes, squash, broccoli, and serving it with salsa verde (an generous name we use for a quick green tomato salad – chopped green tomatoes with garlic, olive oil, and sea salt).    033
The main part of our growing season is nearing an end. The final share of our Farm Share CSA is next Wednesday’s pick up (just in time for Thanksgiving meals!). Market Share CSA members should be finishing up their balances in the next couple of weeks, because the vegetables are starting to freeze. (You have until Dec 31 to use any available credit, but we will not have many vegetables available in December. This ground is going to harden up!) 
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Spy the brussels sprouts in the picture above? This is our first year growing them, and we’re not sure how much they will progress in this cold. Broccoli (below) is freezing in the field, but we have covered many rows of plants with ag fabric to keep them warmer. This may buy us a little extra harvest time. Unless the deer get in the fence and tear up this row fabric. (That’s when the fall is not a happy time.)
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Garlic is now in the ground, cloves tucked under the soil to grow until next summer. This is our first season saving some of our own garlic bulbs to use as seed – an indication of a better crop of garlic than in years past.
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Thank you, as always, to all of you who eat the food that we grow. You make this work possible for us. We look forward to seeing you at both markets this weekend (Brandermill opens back up for a pre-holiday market). We hope you will choose to offer your loved ones gifts from local vendors this year – including consumable goods! We will have our vegetables, as usual (any that aren’t frozen), as well as our bread, pepper jelly, salsa, and a precious few remaining Broadfork hoodies in children’s sizes.

Market Share CSA Members: Remember that your balance expires at the end of 2014, and we don’t harvest much at all in December (especially with the low temps of late). Plan to spend your balance by the end of November. After that, you may “order into the negatives” and settle up your balance with us after ordering. Thank you!
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We are baking extra loaves of bread – two varieties – for this Saturday’s orders/markets!

This week’s Harvest includes:

Our Farm Share Bag (consisting of a farmers’ choice medley of produce, in one easy to order option), Beets, Broccoli (heads and greens), Carrots, Chinese and Traditional Cabbage, Escarole, Garlic, Ginger, Hearty Mix, Juicing Greens, Kohlrabi, Lettuce (three different types of heads), Microgreens, Jalapeno peppers, Salad Mix, Spinach, and Tomatoes (green), Turnips…plus our Pepper Jelly, Salsa, and naturally leavened Hearth Baked Bread (two varieties).

Enjoy ~
Janet, Dan, and the rest of the Broadfork crew

(Want to learn more about us? Visit us on Facebook or Instagram.)

Recipe Suggestions: (cataloged on our Recipe Page)
Baby Ginger - we felt obligated to test some cookie recipes using our fresh baby ginger. This Fresh Ginger Cookie recipe got great reviews from our family and crew. Next we will try this Triple Ginger Cookie. Remember also to put this ginger in any stir fry or soup, or ginger-lemon-honey tea, or freeze it for future use of these recipes. In February we hope you think of us when you pull it out of the freezer!
Broccoli – make Stuffing (feel free to sub real milk and mushrooms for the canned soup it calls for!) or Broccoli Cheese Soup
Sweet Potatoes – the holidays loom and sweet potatoes are usually featured well, but in case you need inspiration: Sweet Potato and Sausage Breakfast Burrito
Green TomatoesBaked Green Tomatoes with Yummy Dip  or Salsa Verde (put on those burritos listed above, and add Fermented Jalapenos to the whole affair!)
Radishes – we haven’t reminded you to roast them in a while. If you can resist putting them on top of a crisp and delicious salad, roasting them is the way to go. And – say what you want about Martha Stewart, but we love the recipes published under her name. Check out the link above – we love that it doesn’t even list quantities! Just use what you have and trust your inner chef.

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We attend TWO farmers’ markets this Saturday: South of the James in Forest Hill Park, from 8am – 12pm and Brandermill Green Market’s Holiday Market.

2014 Market Share CSA Members: Choose your selection through our Online Ordering to order for pick up on Saturday at our farm, at the Brandermill Holiday Market in Market Square, or at the South of the James Market in Forest Hill Park.

Farm Share & Market Share Ordering…11.19.2014

Farm Share Members – This week’s share will likely consist of:
Spinach, Salad Mix, Broccoli, Cooking Greens (collards or cabbage), Sweet Potatoes, Ginger, Garlic, a Root Vegetable (most likely carrots), Radishes, Green Tomatoes, and a special treat that we are really excited about: Fermented Jalapenos. (Each share this week contains one jar of these delicious, versatile preparations, known for their abundance of probiotics. Spicy but not overwhelming, these pepper slices are great on top of just about anything: tacos, burritos, stir fry, curries, lasagna, salsa, etc.)
** Next week (the Wednesday prior to Thanksgiving) is the final week of the Fall Farm Share. We hope you have loved the harvest as much as we have!

Recipe Suggestions: (cataloged on our Recipe Page)
Baby Ginger - we felt obligated to test some cookie recipes using our fresh baby ginger. This Fresh Ginger Cookie recipe got great reviews from our family and crew. Next we will try this Triple Ginger Cookie. Remember also to put this ginger in any stir fry or soup, or ginger-lemon-honey tea, or freeze it for future use of these recipes. In February we hope you think of us when you pull it out of the freezer!
Broccoli – make Stuffing (feel free to sub real milk and mushrooms for the canned soup it calls for!) or Broccoli Cheese Soup
Sweet Potatoes – the holidays loom and sweet potatoes are usually featured well, but in case you need inspiration: Sweet Potato and Sausage Breakfast Burrito
Green TomatoesBaked Green Tomatoes with Yummy Dip  or Salsa Verde (put on those burritos listed above, and add Fermented Jalapenos to the whole affair!)
Radishes – we haven’t reminded you to roast them in a while. If you can resist putting them on top of a crisp and delicious salad, roasting them is the way to go. And – say what you want about Martha Stewart, but we love the recipes published under her name. Check out the link above – we love that it doesn’t even list quantities! Just use what you have and trust your inner chef.

Market Share CSA Members: Remember that your balance expires at the end of 2014, and we don’t harvest much at all in December (especially with the low temps of late). Plan to spend your balance by the end of November. After that, you may “order into the negatives” and settle up your balance with us after ordering. Thank you!

Choose your selection through our Online Ordering of the following harvest for pick up on Wednesday, Nov 19 (on farm, at Good Health Herbs, or at Central Montessori School in Church Hill). NOTE: This week we are offering a different bread variety than usual: Rustic White. It is a lighter bread than our usual multigrain. As always, it is made with 100% Certified Organic flour. And as you prepare for the upcoming holiday celebrations focused on gratitude for the harvest, keep in mind our preserved harvest: Salsa and Pepper Jelly make delicious appetizers, and Fermented Jalapenos add a precious zing to anything!

Our Farm Share Bag (consisting of a farmers’ choice medley of produce, in one easy to order option), Broccoli, Cabbage (mini napa and traditional), Cucumbers (a precious few!), Escarole, Garlic, Ginger, Hearty Mix, Juicing Greens, Lettuce heads, Microgreens, Peppers (jalapeno), Salad Mix, Tomatoes (green)…plus our Pepper Jelly, Salsa, Fermented Jalapenos, and naturally leavened, hearth baked, organic Bread (Rustic White).

Enjoy ~
Janet, Dan, & the whole Broadfork Crew

Food to Heal…for 11.15.2014

“We love this food. We love our community. And we believe in the power of this food to heal our community.” – Dan, at Dinner in the Field‘s meal, 11-7-2014
2014-11-12 csa farm share
(This week’s Farm Share, pictured above.) If you agree that Certified Naturally Grown food is important to your community, please consider contributing to the CNG Fundraiser! Our certifying entity, CNG is a not for profit organization. Expenses are covered in part by our certification fees. To help keep CNG thriving, our certification fees affordable, and provide more resources to farmers like us, make a donation as you are able. DSC_0007
Microgreens update: thanks to customer feedback letting us know they could be cleaner. We have changed our washing process in order to ensure you get all greens and no grit. (This is one of the many benefits of buying directly from the grower! You are able to tell us this and we are able to respond!)
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Now that the cold weather has settled in, greens and roots become even sweeter. Our broccoli greens were prepared as part of Dinner in the Field‘s meal last weekend, which we were fortunate enough to taste. Incredibly delicious! The entire experience with Dinner in the Field is surely a significant investment for a dinner, but it includes professional chef preparation, Italian cuisine education, five courses, plenty of wine, and a carefully tended venue. Enjoying our greens in the comfort of your home misses out on that, and requires that you prepare them, but the price tag is just $3. This recipe for Cannellini Beans and Greens won’t give you the same dish prepared by Chefs Paige and Gregorio, but it will be tasty and we hope it will warm you and nourish you while nestled in your home.    DSC_0008  This week’s Harvest includes:

Our Farm Share Bag (consisting of a farmers’ choice medley of produce, in one easy to order option), Arugula, Asian Greens (Bok Choy, Tokyo Bekana, Asian Spinach), Beets, Broccoli (heads and greens), Chinese and Traditional Cabbage, Cucumbers, Escarole, Garlic, Ginger, Hearty Mix, Juicing Greens, Kohlrabi, Lettuce (three different types of heads), Radishes (black, watermelon, red, french breakfast), Salad Mix, Spinach, and Turnips…plus our Pepper Jelly, Salsa, and naturally leavened Hearth Baked Bread.

Enjoy ~
Janet, Dan, and the rest of the Broadfork crew

(Want to learn more about us? Visit us on Facebook or Instagram.)

Recipe Suggestions: (always cataloged on our Recipe Page)
Baby Ginger - we felt obligated to test some cookie recipes using our fresh baby ginger. This Fresh Ginger Cookie recipe got great reviews from our family and crew. Next we will try this Triple Ginger Cookie. Remember also to put this ginger in any stir fry or soup, or make tea, or freeze it for future use of these recipes. In February we hope you think of us when you pull it out of the freezer!
Green TomatoesFried Green Tomatoes with Goat Cheese Grits, Curried Green Tomatoes, Green Tomato & Avacado Salad….or just add them to any stir fry or salad. They are tart and crunchy and delicious.
Broccoli – Broccoli Cheddar Quiche
Winter Squash & Chard – Lentil Soup with Sausage, Chard & Garlic, or Tuscan Sausage and Chard Soup — simply peel, cube, and add the squash to these recipes to make them even better. We love soup like this.
Scallions & Garlic- add to anything above or anything you are making!

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   Dan – preparing wash tubs for greens with baby attached! What a father…

 

Farm Share & Market Share Ordering…11.12.2014

Farm Share Members – This week’s share will likely consist of:
Salad Mix, Broccoli, Winter Squash (butternut), Chard, Tomatoes (mix of green and red), Garlic, Lettuce, Scallions, a Root Vegetable (most likely carrots), and Baby Ginger.

Recipe Suggestions: (cataloged on our Recipe Page)
Baby Ginger - we felt obligated to test some cookie recipes using our fresh baby ginger. This Fresh Ginger Cookie recipe got great reviews from our family and crew. Next we will try this Triple Ginger Cookie. Remember also to put this ginger in any stir fry or soup, or make tea, or freeze it for future use of these recipes. In February we hope you think of us when you pull it out of the freezer!
Green TomatoesFried Green Tomatoes with Goat Cheese Grits, Curried Green Tomatoes, Green Tomato & Avacado Salad….or just add them to any stir fry or salad. They are tart and crunchy and delicious.
Broccoli - Broccoli Cheddar Quiche
Winter Squash & Chard - Lentil Soup with Sausage, Chard & Garlic, or Tuscan Sausage and Chard Soup — simply peel, cube, and add the squash to these recipes to make them even better. We love soup like this.
Scallions & Garlic- add to anything above or anything you are making!

Market Share CSA Members: Choose your selection through our Online Ordering of the following harvest for pick up on Wednesday, Nov 12 (on farm, at Good Health Herbs, or at Central Montessori School in Church Hill):

Our Farm Share Bag (consisting of a farmers’ choice medley of produce, in one easy to order option), Asian Greens (Bok Choy,Tokyo Bekana, Asian Spinach), Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage (mini napa and traditional), Cucumbers (a precious few!), Escarole, Garlic, Ginger, Hearty Mix, Juicing Greens, Kale, Lettuce heads, Microgreens, Peppers (jalapeno), Radish (black, red, and watermelon), Salad Mix, Tomatoes (green and a few red), Turnips (sweet hakurei)…plus our Pepper Jelly, Salsa, and naturally leavened, hearth baked, organic Bread.

** Our Farm Stand remains open for the next couple of weeks, weather and inventory allowing. **

Enjoy ~
Janet, Dan, & the whole Broadfork Crew

Why our Food is Better…for 11.8.2014

We had our first frost here this week, spelling death for the summer crops. We could talk about seasonal shift and plant cell structure, but instead we have another issue burning inside of us.
lettuce frost 2014-11-03
This week we saw an ad for food purchasing that advertised the options available to customers: “Heritage breed, heirloom varieties, certified humane, certified rare breed, organic, natural, and local options available!” We jest in some of the details there, but the point we want to make stands: No wonder customers are confused! What do all those options mean? What is natural? What is local? What is heritage??? We also saw a buy-a-box-of-local-food-from-us company try to steer customers toward thinking that all of the food in their box was grown (sort of) organically (though we guarantee you it’s not), but also downplay the importance of organic practices. Yikes. This is a lot to sort out.
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We know that we are “insiders” in this world of small scale/local farming, and even insiders in the subset of that world: the organic/Certified Naturally Grown/synthetic free/non toxic sector of farming. We are the professionals, and even we are confused sometimes. We don’t often hop on this stage of “Let us help you understand it” but this week we find ourselves needing to. Why? Because we fully believe that food grown organically – in the manner that nature teaches us (free of toxic chemicals), is important – even critical-, and that food grown with attention to nutritional quality is vital for the health of our community. Furthermore, we know that those two things are not the same. Explanation forthcoming.
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Additionally, we know that the grand majority of farming today is not organic. Chemical pesticides and fertilizers are the norm. Hardly any education exists at all about how to manage pests or fertilize using naturally occurring substances. That makes it harder to be an organic farmer (or organic gardener, for that matter). Local farms are simply not an exception, as much as all of our community would like to believe that. Chemical farming is the norm to such a degree that in the world of agriculture, 99% of the voices say there is no reason to farm organically. However, a lot more than 1% of the consumers say they want organic food. Therein lies the problem.
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Farmers (and anyone who sells food) have a lot of incentive to tell their customers that what they are selling is organic. That gets tricky because to use the word “organic” you need to be certified by the USDA. So, unfortunately, words like “natural” or “sustainable” or “good for you and the planet” are used to describe food that is most certainly not free from chemical fertilizer and pesticides. We have so much that we want to shout from the rooftops about this subject, and this post is already too long (any readers still with us? anyone?). So we’ll plug on a little longer. Thanks for being interested in your health, our health (as farmers of the food), and the health of your (and our) descendants.
girls giant sweet potatoes
As insiders, we feel able to decode what a farm advertises and thus how they handle fertility and pests. And that almost completely boils down to two facts: 1) Is the farm certified (Organic or Naturally Grown. The standards are essentially the same with CNG allowing biodegradable mulch and CO does not, and as insiders in this world we have seen no reason not to believe in the truth behind a farm’s certification.) and/or 2) Does the farm invite you, the consumer of their food, onto the farm for an in-depth tour, explaining how and why they farm, how they fertilize and manage pests, and what they do in the interest of making their food nutritious. (Because remember from above? Organic versus chemical farming is not related to nutritional content.)
farm share 2014-11-05
Now relevant background info: Why do these things really matter? After all, 99% of agriculture says organic practices don’t matter, and that report from a reputable institution (Stanford) said that organic food is not more nutritious than “conventional” (a terrible term used for today’s chemical farming). Here’s where we break it down for you. It’s the reward for reading this far.

BECAUSE: (stay with us here…this train is headed somewhere)
- Soil biology IS soil health. Healthy soil allows us healthy plants. The healthier the plant, the more nutrition is contains.
- There is hardly any soil around (especially on the East Coast), that currently has the composition to grow really nutritious food (without amending).
- Chemical (also called synthetic) fertilizer wrecks (kills) soil biology. It also pollutes the watershed where it eventually ends up. Killing soil biology makes for less healthy plants, and thus less nutritious food. All of this is bad.
- Chemical pesticides are the go-to way to handle bug problems on a farm. Round-up is the go-to way to handle weeds on a farm. These products are known to be harmful to people (and soil health, and animals, and the watershed…). The degree to which they are harmful is still debated, but that was the case with DDT, too. There is also (highly controversial) evidence that pesticides are harmful to the plants on which they are applied. Unhealthy plants = less healthy food. All of this is bad, too.
- Organic farming can simply mean replacing toxic inputs with non-toxic inputs. This does NOT mean the soil is being made healthier, and thus does NOT mean the food being grown is more nutritious. (THIS is the problem with the Standford study. THIS is the nuance…the grey area…the details.) This does mean that soil biology has a better chance, and the farmers are not applying toxic products. That is good, but there is better. Because that is not the same as growing organic food that is also more nutritious.
- Yes, there is good evidence that “not much” chemical residue remains on conventional food purchased by the consumer, and yes, there is evidence that the consumer can wash off their produce and likely not suffer much, or any, harm from the substances. And yes, conventional food may not be any less nutritious than certain organically grown foods.
- However, if you are only concerned with chemical residue at the consumer level you are failing to consider the impacts of toxic chemicals for the farmers, their families, the soil biology, the wildlife, and the watershed. Those matter.
- If you want truly nutritious food, you need food grown with attention to the actual thriving, diverse life and composition of the soil. Combine that with food grown organically, in the manner that nature demonstrates, with attention to plant health above all else, and everyone wins.
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How many local farmers grow food this way? Hardly any. (And those that do usually make a concerted effort to communicate this through all means possible: website, market booth, packaging, etc.) Despite the fact that we know we have a ton still to learn (who doesn’t?), we know we are avoiding all the toxic inputs and going above and beyond organic inputs in order to grow plants that are as healthy as possible. This means more health (nutrition) for the consumers. This is what we explain on our tours (and in too-long blog posts).
ginger cilantro etc
We know there are options for local food that are cheaper and more convenient than our food. And the providers of those options try to convince you, the consumer, that the food is produced organically (“pesticide free” “no spray” “sustainably” “good for you and the earth.”) How can you sort it out? It is hard, we know. But here’s our advice: 1) Re-read this post. 2) Start with the assumption that the food in question is grown with chemicals and no attention to nutritional content. 3) Talk to the farmer (not the re-seller – not the company that packed a box of food from different farmers). Talk to the actual farmer and ask for a public tour. Ask him or her to explain how they approach plant health, nutritional content, soil health, and pest and disease problems. It doesn’t have to matter if you don’t understand the answer. Listen for clues and listen to your gut. Search for the motivation of the farmer. See if it matches up with your motivation for eating and feeding your family.
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**Disclaimer: We know we are extremely privileged, well educated people of a majority race (relatively poor in money but rich in cultural capital). We know relatively few people have the privilege of putting so much attention to their health and how/where they source their food. Much work needs to be done with those that do not yet have this privilege. Today’s words focus on the starting point: Those that do have the privilege of choice, but do not have the privilege of knowledge. We dream of a future in which all people have the knowledge and means to seek out and acquire food grown organically and nutritiously. We dream of a time when we don’t have to make this speech – when chemically grown food is the 1%. Until then, thank you for reading, and thank you for wanting the food we grow.

Fun and unrelated FYI: We are packing about 8 months of social engagement into this one upcoming weekend! Janet and Beckett (and Dan) are ready to venture out a bit (Beckett is now 3 weeks old!) and are headed (thanks to the generosity of others) to the Tricycle Gardens dinner, Dinner in the Field’s season finale dinners (at the Boathouse Restaurant, featuring some of our cooking greens), and hopefully a family trip to a showing of Charlotte’s Web by the Virginia Rep. We have our sights set high! We hope to see some of you around and about.
050This week’s Harvest includes:

Our Farm Share Bag (consisting of a farmers’ choice medley of produce, in one easy to order option), Asian Greens (Bok Choy), Beets, Broccoli, Chard, Chinese and Traditional Cabbage, Collards, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Escarole, Garlic, Ginger, Hearty Mix, Juicing Greens, Kohlrabi, Lettuce (three different types of heads), Peppers (jalapeno, sweet yellow), Radishes (black, watermelon), Salad Mix, and Turnips,  …plus our Pepper Jelly, Salsa, and naturally leavened Hearth Baked Bread.

Enjoy ~
Janet, Dan, and the rest of the Broadfork crew

(Want to learn more about us? Visit us on Facebook or Instagram.)

Certified Naturally Grown Farm in search of:
~ Used/Second-Hand piece of  Kitchen Countertop ~

Recipe Suggestions: (always cataloged on our Recipe Page)
Jalapenos – Seriously, ferment them. Buy 3 pints and ferment them. In December you will thank us. Recipe here. (We slice them once lengthwise and remove the seeds.)
Roots (carrots, turnips, or beets): Roast them! That is the simplest and most enjoyable way to use them this time of year, in our opinion. Roast them with garlic, salt, fat, and protein. OR – Roasted Vegetable Soup is tasty and seasonal.
Ginger: Harvested here in Virginia, ginger only grows to the baby stage – not fully mature with the tough, brown skin. Thus, there is no need to peel our ginger. Slice it thinly and add to any roast, soup, or stir fry for delicious flavor. It also freezes beautifully, and you can slice or grate off of the frozen piece. For the more adventurous, scroll to the bottom of the NPR article for these recipes:  Pickled Ginger, Crystallized Ginger, Ginger Syrup, and a drink with Tequila and Ginger (we haven’t tried this recipe!)
Cabbage: We love Fish Tacos with Slaw. We love Slaw with anything, really.
Bok Choy: Our favorite way to prepare is braised in stock (any kind of stock or broth). (Braising is cooking in liquid for a few minutes.) The stems retain this satisfying crunch. Serve alongside or on top of anything! OR – Stir Fried Bok Choy with Ginger and Garlic.

 

**

We attend one farmers’ markets this Saturday: South of the James in Forest Hill Park, from 8am – 12pm.

2014 Market Share CSA Members: Choose your selection through our Online Ordering to order for pick up on Saturday at our farm, at the Good Health Herbs in Market Square, or at the South of the James Market in Forest Hill Park.

 

Farm Share & Market Share Ordering…11.5.2014

And with that, folks, we have a frost: lettuce frost 2014-11-03
Warm season crops are officially done. Even the tomatoes we had under cover (in the high tunnel) got bitten by this frost. We have a bit of peppers and tomatoes that we picked over the weekend that will go in this week’s share.

Farm Share Members – This week’s share will likely consist of:
Broccoli, Bok Choy, Sweet Potatoes, Lettuce Mix, Cabbage, Cilantro, Ginger Root, Garlic, something from the nightshade family (pepper, tomato, or eggplant), and one of a variety of roots (carrots, turnips, or beets), 
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Pictured above is our ginger root, picked this morning. See this link for a nice article from NPR about baby ginger, and see below for tips on how to enjoy it.

Recipe Suggestions: (cataloged on our Recipe Page)
Roots (carrots, turnips, or beets): Roast them! That is the simplest and most enjoyable way to use them this time of year, in our opinion. Roast them with garlic, salt, fat, and protein. OR – Roasted Vegetable Soup is tasty and seasonal.
Ginger: Harvested here in Virginia, ginger only grows to the baby stage – not fully mature with the tough, brown skin. Thus, there is no need to peel our ginger. Slice it thinly and add to any roast, soup, or stir fry for delicious flavor. It also freezes beautifully, and you can slice or grate off of the frozen piece. For the more adventurous, scroll to the bottom of the NPR article for these recipes:  Pickled Ginger, Crystallized Ginger, Ginger Syrup, and a drink with Tequila and Ginger (we haven’t tried this recipe!)
Cabbage: We love Fish Tacos with Slaw. We love Slaw with anything, really.
Bok Choy: Our favorite way to prepare is braised in stock (any kind of stock or broth). (Braising is cooking in liquid for a few minutes.) The stems retain this satisfying crunch. Serve alongside or on top of anything! OR – Stir Fried Bok Choy with Ginger and Garlic.

Market Share CSA Members: Choose your selection through our Online Ordering of the following harvest for pick up on Wednesday, Nov 5 (on farm, at Good Health Herbs, or at Central Montessori School in Church Hill):

Our Farm Share Bag (consisting of a farmers’ choice medley of produce, in one easy to order option), Arugula, Asian Greens (Bok Choy), Cabbage (mini napa and traditional), Escarole, Garlic, Hearty Mix, Lettuce heads, Lettuce Mix, Radish (black, white, and watermelon), Salad Mix…plus our Pepper Jelly and Salsa.    

Enjoy ~
Janet, Dan, & the whole Broadfork Crew

All Business: Harvest details…for 11.1.2014

Sometimes around here, it is a flurry of harvesting and packing orders, meetings, paperwork, and caring for a newborn.
176We think meetings and paperwork about farming are probably the best meetings and paperwork that exist, but they are still meetings and paperwork. The vegetables are wonderful, the newborn is adorable, and this week’s note is this brief. DSC_0013
This week’s Harvest includes:
Our Farm Share Bag (consisting of a farmers’ choice medley of produce, in one easy to order option), Arugula, Asian Greens (Bok Choy, Tokyo Bekana, Asian Spinach), Broccoli, Chard, Chinese and Traditional Cabbage, Eggplant, Escarole, Garlic, Hearty Mix, Juicing Greens, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce Mix, Microgreens, Peppers (padron, jalapeno, sweet yellow), Radishes (white, black, watermelon), Salad Mix, and Turnips,  …plus our Pepper Jelly and Salsa.

Enjoy ~
Janet, Dan, and the rest of the Broadfork crew

(Want to learn more about us? Visit us on Facebook or Instagram.)

Certified Naturally Grown Farm in search of:
~ Used/Second-Hand piece of  Kitchen Countertop ~

Recipe Suggestions: (always cataloged on our Recipe Page)
Tokyo Bekana: Sauteed with Sesame, Ginger & Soy Sauce
Tokyo Bekana Asian Salad
Risotto with Tokyo Bekana
and so forth. Really, use it like Kale or Spinach. Enjoy!
Green Tomatoes: Grilled Chicken (or any protein) Taco with Green Tomato Salsa
Salsa Verde
or…just mix into any salsa to add some crunch and tartness. Perfect with the Cilantroand Sweet Peppers this week.
Winter Squash: Hands down, our preferred way to prepare winter squash is to cut it in half, place upside down in glass baking dish with a half inch of water added, and baked at around 375 for about 30 minutes or so. Then scoop out the yuumy flesh and serve on the side of anything. Top with warm salsa, or butter and maple syrup, or olive oil with salt and pepper…the options are as long as your creativity.
OR – for smooth skinned varieties, peel, dice, and saute with greens and protein.
OR – bake as above and then mix into a sweet bread dough (think of it like pumpkin here) such as Autumn Spiced Butternut Squash Bread

**

We attend one farmers’ markets this Saturday: South of the James in Forest Hill Park, from 8am – 12pm.

2014 Market Share CSA Members: Choose your selection through our Online Ordering to order for pick up on Saturday at our farm, at the Good Health Herbs in Market Square, or at the South of the James Market in Forest Hill Park.288
Happy two weeks to our newest one (above) and Happy Halloween from the bigger farm kids! (A Rhythmic Gymnast, a Skeleton, and a Shark.) 
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